Gwent Police support Knife Campaign


Superintendent Joanne Bull of Gwent Police visited the British Ironwork Centre today to add her support to the “Save a life surrender your knife” Campaign.

It was a return to her home town for Superintendent Bull, who grew up in the area and went to Oswestry School. Joanne was involved in initiating an amnesty in Gwent, South Wales, 12 months ago. Amnesty bins were supplied by the Ironwork Centre and placed at police stations in the region.

Superintendent Joanne Bull of Gwent Police visited the British Ironwork Centre today to add her support to the “Save a life surrender your knife” Campaign.

It was a return to her home town for Superintendent Bull, who grew up in the area and went to Oswestry School. Joanne was involved in initiating an amnesty in Gwent, South Wales, 12 months ago. Amnesty bins were supplied by the Ironwork Centre and placed at police stations in the region.

"It was an incredible experience to come to where I grew up and see the angel. We supported the amnesty in Gwent and we have recently seen a downturn in violent crime with injury. Every knife surrendered is potentially a life saved," she said.

"The Christmas season is one that can lead to violent crime, when alcohol is flowing and tempers flare. Also it is a time when people suffer mental health issues and are in crisis, when knives can be used to self-harm. There are avenues of support out there such as the Samaritans and I would urge people to seek help."

Superintendent Bull commented that the knife angel delivered a very powerful message.

"It is an incredible sculpture, an amazing piece of art. When you gaze up at the statue and see how many knives have been used and what they represent - weapons taken off the streets all around the UK - it delivers a very powerful message."

"The impact of knife crime is not only on victims but on the families and on witnesses."

Superintendent Joanne Bull inscribed the words, “Heddlu Gwent Police, fighting knife crime, saving lives”, in both Welsh and English, onto a blade on the sculpture at the British Ironwork Centre near Oswestry.

Chairman of the British Ironwork Centre, Clive Knowles, said “we have had about half of the police forces across the UK send a representative to see the sculpture and engrave a message.”

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  • Published on 22nd December 2017